Tag Archives: Strategic Plan

Strategic Plans & Strategic Partnerships


The information in the original Post has been included in Chapter 7 – Goals and Objectives of my new book – “Crash Course in Strategic Planning

“One of the areas of planning that has developed from a 21st Century environment deals with strategic partnerships. Considering that this is a relatively new area of library endeavor, here is a suggestion about incorporating it into your next strategic plan. Remember that goals are the desired results we want to achieve to accomplish the mission, expressed in general terms.

* Goal #7.—Develop Strategic Partnerships.
Expressed in general terms, this Goal is broad enough to allow for more specific Objectives.

• Objective #O7.1—Seek out organizations, companies, agencies of any type within the community that have potential strategic partnership value to the library.
This description defines a specific objective to be proactive in determining what entities within your community have potential benefits for the library through a strategic partnership.

• Activity #A7.1.1 ….” [Pg. 48]

(Matthews, Stephen. Matthews, Kimberly. (2013). Crash course in strategic planning. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited.)

Our book is now available from Libraries Unlimited. Visit their website for more information and an opportunity to order the book.

Thank you for your interest and support of the 21st Century Library Blog.

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Library Strategic Planning Process Overview


The information in the original Post has been included in Chapter 1 – Why Develop a Strategic Plan of my new book – “Crash Course in Strategic Planning

“Technology is changing. Customers are changing. Employees are changing. Communities are changing. Doing things the way we’ve always done them is shortsighted and impractical in the face of drastic 21st Century change. Strategies and processes that worked in the past will not be as effective in the future because both the internal and external environments are dramatically changing. At best, old methods will lead to stagnation, which will leave your library further behind what it should be to survive in the current environment. At worst, maintaining a status quo will lead to your library becoming irrelevant to your community, and eventually to its closure.
A strategic plan requires you to consider the changes in your environment, and to establish and prioritize goals and objectives, which will achieve your mission and vision in the face of these challenges.” [Pg. 1]

“Why is this important?” It is imperative before you begin the process to ensure that you have a consensus among the organization that strategic planning is an important and essential tool for success. Only then will you have the true commitment as opposed to empty agreements. True commitment will be required for participants to provide meaningful contributions to a process that will result in a useful plan with the possibility of effective implementation on all levels.” [Pg. 5]

(Matthews, Stephen. Matthews, Kimberly. (2013). Crash course in strategic planning. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited.)

Our book is now available from Libraries Unlimited. Visit their website for more information and your book orders.

Thank you for your interest and support of the 21st Century Library Blog.

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Library Braintrust


If there ever was a braintrust of library leadership in the United States – this was it! The participants included 20 state librarians, 16 deputy/assistant state librarians, and library directors from American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and PERL (Pacific Resources for Education and Learning based in Honolulu, HI), about 150 total participants. I was among the remaining group of staff who help their state library agency administer the LSTA Grant program.

The occasion was the Institute of Museum and Library Services hosted “Grants to States Conference 2011” to discuss how libraries may spend the $161.3M in federal funds “distributed to the states, the District of Columbia, [and] U.S. territories”.

For two and a half days in mid-March, IMLS has hosted, at their expense, a conference of state library administrative agency (SLAA) representatives to solicit their assistance. IMLS’ mission is “to create strong libraries and museums that connect people to information and ideas” and it is “the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries”.

This was the largest combination of library brainpower, talent and influence it has ever been my privilege to be among, and it included the recent Presidential appointee IMLS Director Susan Hildreth, former Seattle Public Library director, former California State Librarian. That goes for the rest of the IMLS staff who are equally amazing! More than any federal agency I ever encountered – IMLS ROCKS!

From the very opening remarks by Director Hildreth, it was evident that IMLS considered the states’ librarians to be their partners in this new era of federal funding to libraries. As if that wasn’t revolutionary enough, they solicited our expertise and opinions on some pretty weighty issues. Congress has given IMLS new direction regarding areas upon which libraries should focus these federal resources, and IMLS seriously solicited librarians’ input on issues regarding “Barriers” to and “Opportunities” for achieving library program objectives in all states and territories.

For two days we broke into smaller working groups to consider issues such as;
• Building/Sustaining Information Resources
• Targeting Library and Information Services
• Strengthening the Library Workforce
• Integrating Services

Working groups brainstormed and strategized about these topics to provide IMLS with valuable information upon which they will base their new system for reporting our successes with IMLS funds. They are sincerely interested in telling a cohesive “library story” at the national level that will substantiate the value of local libraries, as well as provide accountability and transparency to this invaluable program.

IMHO, this was THE MOST PRODUCTIVE librarian event in which I have ever participated, it was for THE MOST WORTHWHILE GOALS I have ever imagined in connection with helping libraries grow, and it was conducted by THE MOST LIBRARY SUPPORTIVE national organization I have ever experienced.

This and following IMLS events will help guarantee a national perspective on library accomplishments that can subsequently be presented to library funders at all levels. Stay tuned for more detailed information on this hallmark event for libraries.

NOTE: For anyone not familiar with the LSTA Grant program:

For more than 50 years the LSTA [Library Services and Technology Act] Grants to States Program and its predecessors have supported the delivery of library services in the United States. Few public sector agencies in the country have been as responsive as libraries to the extreme shifts brought on by the information age. Rapid changes in information technology resulted in significant reorganization of library work and major changes to library service in public, academic, school, and research settings. Over this period libraries expanded their traditional mission of collecting and circulating physical holdings to one that also provides access to computers, software, and a host of new services, including an ever-increasing pool of digital information services.

The Grants to States Program is the largest grant program run by IMLS; it provides funds to State Library Administrative Agencies (SLAA) using a population-based formula. SLAAs may use federal funds to support statewide initiatives and services; they also may distribute the funds through subgrant competitions or cooperative agreements to public, academic, research, school, and special libraries in their state. The program has the benefit of building the capacity of states to develop statewide plans for library services and to evaluate those services every five years.

The overall purposes of the Library Services and Technology Act are to
 promote improvement in library services in all types of libraries in order to better serve the people of the United States,
 facilitate access to resources in all types of libraries for the purpose of cultivating an educated and informed citizenry, and
 encourage resource sharing among all types of libraries for the purpose of achieving economical and efficient delivery of library services to the public.

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Goals & Objectives within the 21st Century Library Model


The information in the original Post has been included in Chapter 7 – Goals and Objectives of my new book – “Crash Course in Strategic Planning

“A visionary strategic plan is monumentally important to becoming a good library, but it is critical to providing a library that is highly relevant to a 21st Century community. Becoming a highly relevant library in the future environment of your community is venturing into totally unknown territory because there are so many unknown and unfamiliar factors and influences involved as stated throughout this book. Since these factors and influences are changing so rapidly, attempting to accomplish the necessary goals and objectives of a 21st Century library without a strategic plan is unimaginable. Where would you begin? What activities would you select to receive those critically limited resources, or would you just allow staff to randomly do their own thing? How will you know when you’ve achieved any goals or objectives leading toward your mission?

Some librarians think planning strategically or otherwise is a tired old library standard with which everybody is familiar but really can just be ignored. Unfortunately, it’s not something to be ignored when it comes to a strategic plan to guide your public library into this uncertain 21st Century environment. There is too much at stake, including the survival of your library, to simply keep pursuing business as usual and hope for the best.” [Pg. 41]

(Matthews, Stephen. Matthews, Kimberly. (2013). Crash course in strategic planning. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited.)

Our book is now available from Libraries Unlimited. Visit their website for more information and an opportunity to order the book.

Thank you for your interest and support of the 21st Century Library Blog.

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ALA’s New Strategic Plan – Seriously?


Apparently so.

Yesterday a colleague commented “ALA is including some 21st Century ideas in the new strategic plan.” My reply was DON’T WE WISH!!

In case you haven’t read ALA’s new Strategic Plan 2011-2015, here it is for your reading disappointment. Obviously, I have some thoughts on the plan.

The number “21” is not contained anywhere in the document.

The word “century” is not contained anywhere in the document.

The word “relevance” is not contained anywhere in the document.

Neither the word “patron” nor “customer” is contained anywhere in the document.

The word “mobile” is not contained anywhere in the document.

The word “digital” is used once;
“Goal Area: Transforming Libraries
Goal Statement: ALA provides leadership in the transformation of libraries and library services in a dynamic and increasingly global digital information environment.

The word “collection” is used once;
under the “Key Action Area” of Diversity
“Diversity is a fundamental value of the association and its members, and is reflected in its commitment to recruiting people of color and people with disabilities to the profession and to the promotion and development of library collections and services for all people.”

(I’m not even going to get into what a “Key Action Area” is, or how it relates to Goals or Objectives.)

The word virtual is used twice;
“Goal Area: Member Engagement
Objective (1): Increase member and staff innovation and experimentation in the creation of new opportunities for face to face and virtual engagement.”,
and again in their “Big Audacious Goal:
ALA builds a world where libraries, both physical and virtual, are central to life-long discovery and learning and where everyone is a library user.”

The word community is used three times;
“Goal Area: Building the Profession
Objective (4): Increase the diversity of the library workforce to reflect an increasingly diverse national and global community,
and then twice in their “Vivid Description of the Desired Future:
Libraries are widely recognized as key players in economic development, in building strong and vibrant communities, and in sustaining a strong democracy. Library users have access to physical libraries that serve as community learning centers, and online access to library resources 24 hours a day, and through a variety of technologies. Libraries embrace technology and are seen as trusted leaders in the information age. As a result, all types of libraries are adequately funded, librarianship is a sought after profession, librarians are leaders in the information community, information is accessible to all and all people in the United States are literate library users.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ALA is advocating that libraries become community centers. You read it here first. As I’ve predicted, unless libraries find ways to remain relevant to their community AS A LIBRARY, they will become community centers. Apparently, ALA has thrown in the towel and wants us all to become just a community center.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Literacy falls under their “Key Action Areas”, but simply means – “The ALA assists and promotes libraries in helping children and adults develop the skills they need-the ability to read and use computers-understanding that the ability to seek and effectively utilize information resources is essential in a global information society.” This singular statement is the closest the Plan comes to anything 21st Century skills related.

Information literacy is under – “Goal Area: Advocacy, Funding and Public Policy
Objective (4): Lead advocacy for crucial library issues such as literacy, intellectual freedom, privacy, fair use, preservation of our cultural heritage, information literacy …”,
and once more under their “Vivid Description of the Desired Future: Libraries are also recognized as an essential component of the educational system, providing critical youth literacy services…” (Maybe someone can educate me on exactly what “critical youth literacy services” are.)

Collaboration, a major 21st Century Skill, is also under “Goal Area: Advocacy, Funding and Public Policy
“Objective (6): Increase collaboration and alliances with organizations at all levels to advance legislation and public policy issues affecting libraries, librarians and information services.”

ALA’s Strategic Plan is so broad, vague, lofty and overarching that it touches NO 21st Century issue that could in any way be useful to any librarian desiring to become a 21st Century Librarian. But, as I always say, if it works for you, then it’s a good plan. Thanks ALA, for setting the bar so high.

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Values and Guiding Principles – Revisited


Serendipity is a wondrous thing in life. While on vacation back East with our daughter over the Thanksgiving holiday, we were discussing Vision, Mission and Value statements (21st Century Library Strategic Plan – Values and Guiding Principles) for the 21st Century library while driving down the road. We pulled alongside of an 18-wheel truck with a trailer that had both Mission and Value statements – right there on the side of the trailer – in very succinct and definitive terms.

Fortunately, I had a camera, so here is an example of how an organization can make its guiding statements clear to the public.

Just three words that capture the Mission of the organization; Logistics, Transportation, Distribution. Not elaborate, just succinct and easily understood by the organization’s market.

Unfortunately, this picture below was not as good quality, but the Value Statement was impressive.


In case it’s not readable enough:

6 values
one direction >

Integrity
People
Customer Service
Entrepreneurship
Performance
Social Responsibility

Another simple and succinct, relevant, useful and publically displayed message.

Excellent examples. Thanks NFI!

Anyone else seen any good statements displayed lately?

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Strategic Planning – So What?


The information in the original Post has been included in Chapter 1 – Why Develop a Strategic Plan of my new book – “Crash Course in Strategic Planning

“Technology is changing. Customers are changing. Employees are changing. Communities are changing. Doing things the way we’ve always done them is shortsighted and impractical in the face of drastic 21st Century change. Strategies and processes that worked in the past will not be as effective in the future because both the internal and external environments are dramatically changing. At best, old methods will lead to stagnation, which will leave your library further behind what it should be to survive in the current environment. At worst, maintaining a status quo will lead to your library becoming irrelevant to your community, and eventually to its closure.
A strategic plan requires you to consider the changes in your environment, and to establish and prioritize goals and objectives, which will achieve your mission and vision in the face of these challenges.” [Pg. 1]

“Why is this important?” It is imperative before you begin the process to ensure that you have a consensus among the organization that strategic planning is an important and essential tool for success. Only then will you have the true commitment as opposed to empty agreements. True commitment will be required for participants to provide meaningful contributions to a process that will result in a useful plan with the possibility of effective implementation on all levels.” [Pg. 5]

(Matthews, Stephen. Matthews, Kimberly. (2013). Crash course in strategic planning. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited.)

Our book is now available from Libraries Unlimited. Visit their website for more information and your book orders.

Thank you for your interest and support of the 21st Century Library Blog.

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21st Century Librarianship – Part 5, Collaboration


STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS and COLLABORATION

Public libraries have evolved gradually as institutions of learning, but in the 21st Century, more and more of these bastions of knowledge are asserting themselves as anchors of community activity and development. Long past are the days of libraries as passive repositories of information. To remain relevant, the public library must develop a multi-directional organizational culture that can adjust to constant and rapid changing conditions and that incorporate non-routine, technical, creative, and interactive approaches to public service. [Paraphrased from IMLS 2009 publication Museums, Libraries, and 21st Century Skills.]

Strategic Partnerships

What better way to show a library’s relevance to its community than by getting involved. I have long advocated strategic planning to provide direction and organization to the library’s resources. The MAIN purpose of the strategic plan is to define and elaborate on the library’s mission and goals. If a potential role of a 21st Century Library is to be a focal point of activity within its community, what better way to accomplish that than through being involved in community activities.

OK, your first thoughts are probably “We are involved in community activities.” We host story hour for pre-schoolers, a summer reading program, homework helpline, cultural events of all kinds, and we’re “busier than a cat in a room full of rocking chairs”. While all these are laudable activities, but – THEY ARE ALL LIBRARY CENTRIC! Not a single one of those activities is outside the library, involve any other agency or business from the community, or are a result of a community needs assessment. Strategic Partnerships are not library-centric, they are community-centric.

In a 21st Century Library, strategic partnerships are built through finding out what THE COMMUNITY needs, and filling that need if it is within the capabilities of the library.

For example, you (21st Century Librarian) attend your city council meeting and hear that your local XYZ Factory is having trouble recruiting workers with appropriate language skills. The community needs some work force development help, but there is no other agency (such as an Office of Work Force Development) or organization (such as a trade school) that appears capable of fulfilling that need. You remember Your Library has a bi-lingual librarian with ESL experience, so you jump up all enthused and yell “The library can do that! We can organize and host ESL classes in cooperation with the XYZ Factory.” THAT creates a strategic partnership between XYZ Factory and Your Library that will benefit a major economic force within your community. (OK, you could wait until the next day, give it some thought and develop a more comprehensive plan before jumping into a major commitment like that, but it sounded good didn’t it!)

Doesn’t it also seem reasonable that the XYZ Factory will reciprocate with assistance to the library, either funding, or equipment, or volunteer support. At the very least at the next city council budget hearing, won’t the President of the XYZ Factory stand up and tell the city council how much Your Library has helped improve their workforce which has improved their business, which is VERY good for the local economy.

That’s what strategic partnerships are all about WIN – WIN! Think outside the walls of Your Library and find those strategic partners with whom you can create that WIN-WIN relationship and solidify your relevance to your community.

Collaboration

Collaboration is one of the cornerstones of the 21st Century Skills model. In this context, the key characteristics of an intentional and purposeful collaboration include:
•The ability to work effectively and respectfully with diverse teams and organizations.
•The flexibility and willingness to compromise to accomplish common goals.
•A shared responsibility for work and value of individual contributions.

In my Post of September 30, 21st Century Library Collaboration, I spotlighted a new model of collaboration prepared by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine MidContinental Region Collaboration Working Group and presented in the webinar series “Navigating Collaboration: A Crash Course in Connecting with the Community”. The model presents four “levels” of partnerships, from simple (First Level) to complex (Fourth Level) depending on; (1) the amount of time partners invest, (2) the amount of trust exchanged between the parties, and (3) the amount of turf partners are willing to share. It proposes four levels of partnership – Network, Coordinate, Cooperate, Collaborate, with their respective primary goals.

Examples of collaboration include;
Network
•Participate in a health fairs with a table full of library information. While there, stopping at all the booths to say hello to all the other “vendors.”
Coordinate
•Alternate hosting of classes or meetings – one session at the library, another session at the partner’s facility
Cooperate
•Share a booth at a health fair, but each organization takes different times staffing it; that means each person at the booth is able to promote both agencies giving accurate information about the partner’s activities.
Collaborate
•The library hires a staff person who is embedded in a community organization.

NOW – Consider the example of a Strategic Partnership with the XYZ Factory in the context of the Collaboration model immediately above. What do you envision?

No, don’t read on. Think about what a Strategic Partnership with the XYZ Factory and the example of Collaboration might produce.

Think………….

Think……..

Think…

Hopefully you envisioned a librarian embedded with the XYZ Factory doing 21st Century Librarianship work, possibly even establishing a library branch. It’s not traditional. It’s not normal. It’s not library-centric. It’s 21st Century Librarianship!!

These new ways of thinking about the role of the librarian in the 21st Century community though strategic partnerships and collaboration, is just one of the many ways that 21st Century librarianship helps lead the library into its new role and back to relevance in the community.

What other skills / knowledge would you recommend for 21st Century Librarianship?

More to come…………………
Next up: 21st Century Librarianship – Part 6:
Advocacy.

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Your Library and 21st century skills or “21st Century Skills”


 
In my Blog post of August 26, I pointed out that “… last fall the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) launched its 21st Century Skills initiatives with a 40 page report titled “Museums, Libraries, and 21st Century Skills” [Citation: Institute of Museum and Library Services (2009). Museums, Libraries, and 21st Century Skills (IMLS-2009- NAI-01). Washington, D.C.], in which the Institute provided this appeal to the library profession.”

The relationship between libraries, museums, and their communities is at a critical intersection. There has never been a greater need for libraries and museums to work with other organizations in effectively serving our communities; there has never been a more rapid period of change affecting museums, libraries, and their communities; and there has never been a more challenging period of economic dislocation facing the people in our communities. As a result, there has never been a better opportunity for libraries and museums to act as leaders for positive change and collaboration. Our libraries and museums can and should seize the opportunity to position our institutions in light of these 21st century challenges.

“The Museums, Libraries, and 21st Century Skills project is designed to help library and museum leaders play a catalytic role in this dialogue, …. It is our hope that the conversations sparked by this report and tool will invigorate meaningful collaborations among cultural institutions and other stakeholders to help every community embrace its 21st century challenges with enthusiasm and confidence.”

I’m thinking that people and organizations are still struggling with an understanding and definition of 21st century skills upon which to establish their Goals, Objectives, Activities, Measures and Outcomes. In that 40 page report, IMLS also provided in broad terms the 21st Century Skills Framework, based on the model from Partnership for 21st Century Skills that will serve as a basic understanding of what are 21st century skills as related to libraries.

21st Century Skills Framework – Adapted for Libraries and Museums

LEARNING AND INNOVATION SKILLS
• Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
• Creativity and Innovation
• Communication and Collaboration
• Visual Literacy
• Scientific and Numerical Literacy
• Cross-Disciplinary Thinking
• Basic Literacy

INFORMATION, MEDIA, AND TECHNOLOGY SKILLS
• Information Literacy
• Media Literacy
• Information, Communications and Technology (ICT) Literacy

LIFE AND CAREER SKILLS
• Flexibility and Adaptability
• Initiative and Self-Direction
• Social and Cross-Cultural Skills
• Productivity and Accountability
• Leadership and Responsibility

21ST CENTURY THEMES
• Global Awareness
• Financial, Economic, Business, and Entrepreneurial Literacy
• Civic Literacy
• Health Literacy
• Environmental Literacy

One of the main issues related to this 21st Century Skills movement is the “education” perspective and emphasis that some librarians in the public sector may feel are not relevant to their situation.

The P21 framework has been adopted by 13 states and numerous organizations and associations, notably including the National Education Association (NEA) and the American Association of School Librarians (AASL). The IMLS Project Team and Task Force used the P21 framework as the basis on which to customize this list of skills that are most relevant for libraries and museums.

[Institute of Museum and Library Services (2009). Museums, Libraries, and 21st Century Skills (IMLS-2009- NAI-01). Washington, D.C., Pg. 3.]

Obviously, academia has the impetus and vested interest in providing youth with a 21st Century education that can prepared them for the workforce and a productive, fulfilled life. While IMLS has left the door open for other 21st century education models (“One well-vetted and widely accepted framework that defines “21st century skills” has been offered by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills (P21), a non-profit coalition sponsored by education, business, and community organizations.” Ibid. Pg. 3.), I think the truth is that there are none – no other comprehensive education models that more effectively describe 21st century skills and elaborate techniques to teach these skills to school youth.

Point being, don’t let the generic 21st century skills required for an effective 21st century workforce get confused with P21’s “21st Century Skills” model. It is all essentially the same, and any good model provides an excellent framework upon which to establish your Goals, Objectives, Activities, Measures and Outcomes. If your local community 21st century skills are different, go with that. The main thing is to get a grasp on YOUR understanding of 21st century skills and how they relate to YOUR library.

So what vested interests do public libraries have in adopting a 21st century skills perspective in library services?

Hopefully, anyone in the library profession should be able to recognize our vested interests in adopting a 21st century skills perspective. It is several fold.

    • It puts us in sync with how our local education institutions’ libraries are providing customer-centered services.
    • It enables us to develop services that will allow our library to remain relevant.
    • It keeps us proactive in adopting technology and applying it effectively for customer services.
    • It defines what the future customer information needs will be.
    • It defines how the future customer behaves.
    (and many more that you can think of……)

“Skills like critical thinking and problem solving are not only relevant for K-12 students and schools. There are millions of adult learners not in formal education programs looking to refine workplace skills. Even school-aged children spend the overwhelming majority of their waking hours in non-school settings, and increasingly they spend this time in organized out-of-school settings such as afterschool, museum, and library programs. In these settings, they develop important skills— such as problem solving, collaboration, global awareness, and self-direction—not only for lifelong learning and everyday activities, but also for use back in K-12 schools and college classrooms.” (Ibid. Pg. 4. Emphasis added.)

The 21st century mindset for librarians must become one of embracing the importance and necessity of 21st century skills, and the library’s place in that vision of the future society. Public libraries are already behind other segments of society, especially school and academic libraries, and must become proactive in incorporating 21st century skills thinking in our 21st Century library services.

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21st Century Strategic Plan – Why Develop a Strategic Plan?


The information in the original Post has been included in Chapter 1 – Why Develop a Strategic Plan of my new book – “Crash Course in Strategic Planning

“Technology is changing. Customers are changing. Employees are changing. Communities are changing. Doing things the way we’ve always done them is shortsighted and impractical in the face of drastic 21st Century change. Strategies and processes that worked in the past will not be as effective in the future because both the internal and external environments are dramatically changing. At best, old methods will lead to stagnation, which will leave your library further behind what it should be to survive in the current environment. At worst, maintaining a status quo will lead to your library becoming irrelevant to your community, and eventually to its closure.
A strategic plan requires you to consider the changes in your environment, and to establish and prioritize goals and objectives, which will achieve your mission and vision in the face of these challenges.” [Pg. 1]

“Why is this important?” It is imperative before you begin the process to ensure that you have a consensus among the organization that strategic planning is an important and essential tool for success. Only then will you have the true commitment as opposed to empty agreements. True commitment will be required for participants to provide meaningful contributions to a process that will result in a useful plan with the possibility of effective implementation on all levels.” [Pg. 5]

(Matthews, Stephen. Matthews, Kimberly. (2013). Crash course in strategic planning. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited.)

Our book is now available from Libraries Unlimited. Visit their website for more information and your book orders.

Thank you for your interest and support of the 21st Century Library Blog.

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